The quotation process usually begins with a meeting often arranged either by phone of email. A time is proposed by the prospective client and a site visit is organised.

The work is discussed further, areas are measured and photographs are taken.

Customers then receive an email outlining the preliminary costs. Should they find these acceptable then a full written quotation specifying all details of work to be undertaken is sent.

Once the client has confirmed they wish to go ahead then work can be booked.

Listed properties

When a building is listed then the process is somewhat different and can be take longer.

 

The above example is very typical of the type of property on which I work.


Many conservation department require an example square metre.

You will need permission from the conservation department of your local council if the area you wish to restore is considered large - i.e. an elevation of your property.

The joints are filled with mortar

Smaller areas are classed as like-for-like repairs and don't need consent. However, it is arguable as to what constitutes a small area.


The mortar is then brush finished to weatherproof it

Depending on which area of the country you reside, you may find it could take a conservation officer up to six months before you recieve a visit - it depends on how busy they are. In other areas email photographs of are sufficient. Once once you have recieved consent then an example area is sometimes required from your contractor. However, there are now far fewer requests for this nowadays and conservation officers are more likely to drop by and  inspect the work whilst it is being undertaken or when it's finished.

Joints are finished flush to avoid frost sitting on the upper ledges of the stone and the example area is ready to be inspected.

Once listed building consent has been granted, the work can be booked.

N.B.I usually only come out to do quotes once a prospective client has recieved consent.


For more information on listed building consent, please go to: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/professional/advice/our-planning-role/consent/lbc/